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Thread: More masses of moth cats

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  1. #1
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    Default More masses of moth cats

    Both clusters were found on a tree in the Botanic Gardens, identified to be a Terminalia ivorensis.

    These were from early December, seen for about two days and thereafter they disappeared (from sight):



    These are more recent - they have been stationary near the base of the tree since last week. Each cat is 8-9cm long, and I counted about ~160 individuals:





    Would appreciate some pointers as to what they may be. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    That is amazing!
    Aaron Soh

  3. #3
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    quite freaky actually.
    btw why are u doing up so late young man?
    In the spirit of science, there really is no such thing as a 'failed experiment.' Any test that yields valid data is a valid test.

    -Mark-

  4. #4
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    Sad news... they've killed all the cats. Sprayed with insecticide, apparently. It was a depressing sight (that's a pile of poop below):



    I collected 6 of them earlier in the week, and they've started pupating. Shall see what emerges - hopefully it'll be easier to ID then.

  5. #5
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    Ah... sounds good. At least there's hope of seeing some adult moths now, and for Roger to ID them. I told Roger about your finds of lots of moth cats. We were in SBG the other day, but couldn't find any.
    Khew SK
    Butterflies of Singapore BLOG
    Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try

  6. #6
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    Huh?! I thought SBG pledged not to use any artificial means of killing such as pesticides and let nature take its course?
    Plus, why get rid of them? They produce all that rich frass at the base of the tree.
    Aaron Soh

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander View Post
    Ah... sounds good. At least there's hope of seeing some adult moths now, and for Roger to ID them. I told Roger about your finds of lots of moth cats.
    Thanks, Khew.

    I did some DIY identification, and I think the first ones are Metanastria hyrtaca. The brown ones are of the family Lasiocampidae, but beyond that I've no idea.

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