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Thread: Knight - different forms?

  1. #1
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    Default Knight - different forms?

    The knights of P.Ubin seem to be different from that of Sime Forest.

    @ near OBS-camp2 (2004-Aug-14)


    @ Terentail Trail (2004-May-15)
    skyflash (or Tan CP) (4095.2m @ 040528-0711) (4200m@050930-16xx)
    #1@030809/AHBT Centurion@040829/SF #200@051101/Ubin
    @istockphoto @picasaweb (by family) @photobucket (-2008) (2008-) @multiply (blogs)

  2. #2
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    Default

    here are 2 more local ones for comparison


    male


    Female

  3. #3
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    Good that CP noticed the differences. However, I'd still say that the Terentang Trail specimen is just worn and weary, and the variation of the mauve (that's light bluish) border of the hindwings are just a tad worn out. The local subspecies parkeri has that bluish tinge - more so in the female than in the male, but the ones at Ubin and Tekong have more variations that they appear to be closer to the subspecies malayana that is found just across the Straits of Johor.

    You can see the differences on my website. The Malaysian subspecies was shot at Desaru. The 3rd subspecies found in Pulau Langkawi is even more orange-red in colour.
    Khew SK
    Butterflies of Singapore BLOG
    Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try

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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander
    Good that CP noticed the differences. However, I'd still say that the Terentang Trail specimen is just worn and weary, and the variation of the mauve (that's light bluish) border of the hindwings are just a tad worn out. The local subspecies parkeri has that bluish tinge - more so in the female than in the male, but the ones at Ubin and Tekong have more variations that they appear to be closer to the subspecies malayana that is found just across the Straits of Johor.

    You can see the differences on my website. The Malaysian subspecies was shot at Desaru. The 3rd subspecies found in Pulau Langkawi is even more orange-red in colour.
    interesting insight on the knight

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander
    Good that CP noticed the differences. However, I'd still say that the Terentang Trail specimen is just worn and weary, and the variation of the mauve (that's light bluish) border of the hindwings are just a tad worn out.
    oops. I just realise that I have labelled wrongly.
    (not going to edit the original post to avoid confusion).
    skyflash (or Tan CP) (4095.2m @ 040528-0711) (4200m@050930-16xx)
    #1@030809/AHBT Centurion@040829/SF #200@051101/Ubin
    @istockphoto @picasaweb (by family) @photobucket (-2008) (2008-) @multiply (blogs)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustic
    oops. I just realise that I have labelled wrongly.
    (not going to edit the original post to avoid confusion).
    Heh heh... so the one labelled Terentang Trail is actually from Ubin? That's more like it. The ones in Ubin and Tekong have slightly more red and less blue, but the variations are inconclusive. We have a specimens displaying a range of variations, and the worn-out ones cause even more confusion.
    Khew SK
    Butterflies of Singapore BLOG
    Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander
    Heh heh... so the one labelled Terentang Trail is actually from Ubin? That's more like it. The ones in Ubin and Tekong have slightly more red and less blue, but the variations are inconclusive. We have a specimens displaying a range of variations, and the worn-out ones cause even more confusion.
    are the color due to structural variations? was reading up a bit the other day about the coloration.
    skyflash (or Tan CP) (4095.2m @ 040528-0711) (4200m@050930-16xx)
    #1@030809/AHBT Centurion@040829/SF #200@051101/Ubin
    @istockphoto @picasaweb (by family) @photobucket (-2008) (2008-) @multiply (blogs)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustic
    are the color due to structural variations? was reading up a bit the other day about the coloration.
    Gets rather cheem, these evolutionary processes which split the species into sub-species. After many generations, they sometimes evolve further into a distinct species, where they can no longer mate with another of the same species (from which it evolved).

    Lots of such endemic subspecies on the islands of Malaysia, where the butts look quite different from the mainland species.
    Khew SK
    Butterflies of Singapore BLOG
    Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Commander
    Gets rather cheem, these evolutionary processes which split the species into sub-species. After many generations, they sometimes evolve further into a distinct species, where they can no longer mate with another of the same species.
    Read something like this 1-2 weeks ago. There is a "type" of birds that live in the artic circle. Starting from a particular place and going anti-clockwise, there are five different "forms" 1 to 5. "Forms" from consecutive numbers can inter-breed, so technically they are subspecies. However, 'forms' 1 and 5, which live close to each other, cannot inter-breed, which means different species!
    NEO Chee Beng

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