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Thread: ID for few Butterflies from Bhutan

  1. #11
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    Nice observation Aaron Soh and Dr. Seow.

    There are two tricky specimens (Photos shot by Tshulthrim Drukpa Wangyel) here Dr. Seow. Most likely these are relatively recently listed species.

    There is a catalogue published by Ugyen Wangchuck Insttute for Conservaton and Environment, Bhutan which I have uploaded on my google drive

    Here is the link. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1MN...A6Y_R1HotG9XGQ


    The fist one is listed as Esakiozephyrus camurius (Murayama, 1986) in the catalogue.

    When Tshulthrim Drukpa Wangyel had asked someone to help him in identifying the second specimen, he was told that it is Esakiozerphyrus camurius

    Both me and Tshulthrim are confused. Both of them could be the same species and it looks as if they are added to check lists recently.

    Are both specimen the same species? Any idea on the status of the species Dr. Seow?


    Esakiozerphyrus camurius by GKBaliga, on Flickr


    Fujiokaozephyrus camrius by GKBaliga, on Flickr
    Regards gkbaliga

  2. #12
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    Yes, they are both E. camurius..
    The broad white band, its position on the wings all match correctly. The 2nd specimen is very worn& the orange markings faded.

    E.camurius is readily IDed because ir is the only species in the genus with a broad white band.
    The band also makes a sharp triangle in space 1b.

    The others have a narrow white band which do nt forms a sharp trangle in space 1b.

    Huang made several collecting espeditions to the Tibetan side.
    In the link below in colour plate IV fig 29 is E camurius. fig 27 E.longicaudatus, fig 28 E. bieti.
    http://www.zobodat.at/pdf/Neue-Entom..._0065-0151.pdf


    Another species found in Tibet Assam, Manipur & surrounding areas E. tsangkei is now Teratozephyrus tsangkei.
    This resembles E. camurius with a very thin white band.
    Below Fig 55, 56.
    https://archive.org/stream/tudesdent...e/n62/mode/1up
    Huang also shows a torn female at plate IV fig 30.


    TL Seow: Cheers.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psyche View Post
    Rapala buxaria is a synonym of R. rectivitta.
    https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Rapala_rectivitta
    http://yutaka.it-n.jp/lyc4/83960001.html

    TL Seow: Cheers.
    Whoops i didn't realise that. Thx Dr Seow.
    Aaron Soh

  4. #14
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    Thank you Dr Seow

    Is there any species with the name Fujiokaozephyrus camrius?
    If yes, is it synonymous with E. camrius?
    Any info available on it?



    Our good old Tshulthrim Drukpa Wangyel gives me three more images from Bhutan with a request to see if they can be identified.

    02 by GKBaliga, on Flickr


    02a by GKBaliga, on Flickr

    01 by GKBaliga, on Flickr
    Regards gkbaliga

  5. #15
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    [QUOTE=gkbaliga;132826]Thank you Dr Seow

    Is there any species with the name Fujiokaozephyrus camrius?
    If yes, is it synonymous with E. camrius?
    Any info available on it?

    As long as the species name camurius is the same it is the same butterfly.

    Murayama first name camurius as Ezakiozephyrus camurius in 1986.
    Fujioka placed camurius as a subspecies of tsangkie in the genus Teratzephyrus ie as T. tsangkie camurius in 1994.
    Huang in 2001 restore camurius as a full species, ie Teratozephyrus camurius.

    Koiwaya in 2007 create Fujiokaozephyrus (in honour of Fujioka) for these two closely related species F. camurius & tsangkie.
    http://ftp.funet.fi/index/Tree_of_li...sakiozephyrus/
    https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fujiokaozephyrus

    1. male Pseudoborbo bevani. This form with small rounded spots is common in the northern areas.
    eg Hong Kong.
    http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8335/8...1f535518_b.jpg
    http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8468/8...efa00688_h.jpg

    2. male Pelopidas agna. Note HW with a cellspot . UnH with a uniform brown colour.
    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-yFt6Y2FL2K...A_male_06a.jpg
    http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5655/...b686905d29.jpg

    P. mathias is often confused. UnH with pale shadings giving it an uneven ground colour.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelo...lopidas_sp.jpg
    https://www.thaibutterflies.com/wp-c...as-mathias.jpg


    3. Borbo cinnara. Generally darker than P. bevani with greenish hairs.
    http://butterfliesvietnam.blogspot.c...ice-swift.html


    TL Seow: Cheers.

  6. #16
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    Ha Ha......This Taxonomy is interesting Dr. Seow.

    Keeps changing, doesn't it. You are an Encyclopedia. You seem to have answers to every doubt of ours.
    Just for my information, are all these changes approved through ICZN or on the basis of scientific papers published?

    Thanks for other ids
    Regards gkbaliga

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkbaliga View Post
    Ha Ha......This Taxonomy is interesting Dr. Seow.

    Keeps changing, doesn't it. You are an Encyclopedia. You seem to have answers to every doubt of ours.
    Just for my information, are all these changes approved through ICZN or on the basis of scientific papers published?

    Thanks for other ids

    I have no knowledge of this species, but merely googled the answers from the net.

    The ICZN is particularly important in the species name ie camurius.
    This is the earliest name & have priority.
    If there are other name given to this butterfly at a later date they are invalid.
    The taxon (=taxonomic name)camurius is the valid name of this butterfly.
    This name should published in a reputable or established scientific publication.
    It need not be in English but nowaday it is imperative to have an English translation.

    Any dispute regarding this name can be referred to ICZN.

    As to change in the generic name it depends on the scientist .
    Koiwaya create a new genus Fujiokaozephyrusbecause he find that camurius is diferent in many respect to other species placed in both Teratzephyrus & Esakiozephyrus.

    Acceptance to the generic name change is fromm peer scientists who study his paper.

    If you disagree you can continue to use Esakiozephyrus. There is no penalty.

    Another case in point is Pseudoborbo bevani. Lee made the generic name change in 1966.
    Many scientists felt it was unnecessary & continue with Borbo bevani.

    The name Pseudoborbo have gain traction because it is widely used in east Asia by many Japanese scientists, & bloggers.

    In a recent DNA study paper ,the author found there is sufficient justification for the change to Pseudoborbo.
    The same author also divides Polytremis into several genera (groan!)

    In another case, a DNA study have shown all the Asian Charaxes & Polura species are closely related to each other & to a group of Charaxes species in Africa.
    This means that all Polyura species should be put back into Charaxes.
    Butterflies of India have follow suit, but few scientists have made the change.


    TL Seow: Cheers.

  8. #18
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    Ha ha... Yes Dr. Seow.

    This Taxonomy thing is both a challenge as well as fun. I just watch these things without really getting deep into it since I am a hobbyist.

    Keeps changing and always fraught with controversies.

    I had heard about the earlier proposed change about Psuedoborbo, but was not aware of the latest DNA study reports. Not aware of the Polytremis also.

    Some people maintain that the charaxes issue is not yet settled to satisfactory level and continue with Polyura.

    Thanks for all the discussion anyways.
    Regards gkbaliga

  9. #19
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    Some other taxa with uncertain status:

    -Spidasis/Cigaritis- generally regarded as distinct

    -Deudorix/Virachola- one of them lacks secondary sexual characters and because of this most taxonomists agree to keep them separate. Those that disagree sink Virachola as a subgenus

    -Zeltus/Hypolycaena- Hypolycaena comprises a very heterogeneous lot of spp and some taxonomists prefer to split the African and Indo-Australian spp. Z. amasa is actually closer to the African spp. It's well-known that the early stages of spp. like erylus and phorbas are quite different from the rest of the monocot-feeding spp. and for that there have been proposals to split these few from the rest

    -Arhopala abseus- apparently this is now in Flos, which is not very surprising
    Aaron Soh

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