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Thread: ID help please

  1. #51
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    Revision No. 2.

    There seem to be a tooth at vein 2, a 'V' mark can just be made out at vein 2, just that it is out of focus.
    The medium size would exclude both zylda & stubbsi.

    With the presence of the tooth it is either A. amphimuta or major.
    The postdiscal band is fairly intact & the V spot though fat have equal arms.

    Most likely A. amphimuta
    My slight reservation is that in this male the bit of HW upperside margin does not show any blue.
    Typical A. amphimuta.
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-J9Xmngyim6...+amphimuta.jpg

    TL Seow: Cheers.

  2. #52
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    Thanks for the IDs Uncle Seow.


    Regarding post 47 Arhopala no. 1, a possible explanation for the dark upperside colouration is that the angle of the butterfly to my camera's flash was such that the reflective scales did not shine back in my direction, leaving the wings looking dark. These reflective uppersides are bound to show different colours when light is shining at them from different angles. If you are confident this is A. athada from the upperside, I would leave it as such, since A. athada is a common species and it is more likely to be that. Unfortunately this is the only shot of this individual that I have.

    As for post 47 Arhopala no. 2, is it possible that it is a female A. amphimuta? The extent of the brown border does seem too broad.
    cheers
    Jonathan
    http://nypsbluebottle.blogspot.com/
    --- nothing happens by coincidence - everything is DESTINY ---

  3. #53
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    One Miletus for now...




    cheers
    Jonathan
    http://nypsbluebottle.blogspot.com/
    --- nothing happens by coincidence - everything is DESTINY ---

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banded Yeoman View Post
    Thanks for the IDs Uncle Seow.


    Regarding post 47 Arhopala no. 1, a possible explanation for the dark upperside colouration is that the angle of the butterfly to my camera's flash was such that the reflective scales did not shine back in my direction, leaving the wings looking dark. These reflective uppersides are bound to show different colours when light is shining at them from different angles. If you are confident this is A. athada from the upperside, I would leave it as such, since A. athada is a common species and it is more likely to be that. Unfortunately this is the only shot of this individual that I have.

    As for post 47 Arhopala no. 2, is it possible that it is a female A. amphimuta? The extent of the brown border does seem too broad.

    For no. 1 I leave it as A. athada.. I have look at it several times but can't explain the dull dark purple colour.
    The profile shot means the butt is perpendicular to the camera.
    All other Arhopala shot this way have a noticeable blue colour.

    No 2 is probably female as the bulging abdomen indicate. The off-focus end look like a male.


    Now the Milrtus you have shot is also interesting.

    The 4 recorded species in Singapore are M. biggsii, symethus, gopara, & gaesa.

    Note the three subapical spots are spot 4, 5, & 6, At t6he top of spot 6 is a small one in space 7 (not in space 9 as in Arhopala).
    There are 3 costal spots spot 9, 10, & 11.

    M. biggsii; FW spot 6 shifted out of line from spot 4 & 5.
    Male.
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...%20biggsii.jpg

    eg females.
    https://wanderingbutterflyeffect.fil...e9e02a000b.jpg
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...20-%20bene.jpg


    M. gopara ;FW spot 6 almost in line. Female more prominent 'tailed.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miletu...raMUpUnAC1.jpg
    female.
    http://v3.boldsystems.org/pics/BOPMB...1341158498.JPG


    M. gaesa ;FW spot 6 in line with spot 4 & 5; HW often with stronger tornal shading.

    M. symethus.FW spot 6 almost in line; spots poorly defined ; whitish shading of apices of both wings.
    female.
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...562-copy-4.jpg


    Are there examnples in the past.

    Possible female M. gopara. The tail varies ;This one has it longer than the M. biggsii female.
    http://photobucket.com/gallery/user/...LmpwZw==/?ref=

    Probable Female M. gaesa.
    Spot 6 is virtually in line with spot 4 & 5.
    The tornal shading may not be an ID feature. (image in Fleming has this).
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...llen%20Tan.JPG

    Your pix also suggest male M. gaesa or M. gopara since FW spot 6 is in line with spot 4 & 5.
    (if the tornal shading is an ID feature than it is closer to M. gopara.)

    TL Seow: Cheers.
    Last edited by Psyche; 07-Oct-2018 at 10:47 PM. Reason: clarification

  5. #55
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    Revision.

    Your pic looks to be a female since there is a slight angulation of the HW.
    Practically all malea have rounded HWs.

    If a female then perhaps M. gaesa.


    Mating pair M. biggsii.
    https://nss.org.sg/butterflies_list/...php?img_id=589


    The dislocation of FW spot 6 may be slight as same in the female on the left.
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...20-%20bene.jpg

    TL Seow: Cheers.

  6. #56
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    Uncle Seow, thanks for the ID and elaboration of the different Miletus species!

    I agree with you that this individual is a female, as the hindwings are distinctly angled. In the 2nd picture, the angle of the butterfly to the camera and the shallow depth of field makes this difficult to see.

    Just to clarify, would M. gopara female have a more prominent tail as compared to M. gaesa female?
    cheers
    Jonathan
    http://nypsbluebottle.blogspot.com/
    --- nothing happens by coincidence - everything is DESTINY ---

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Banded Yeoman View Post
    Uncle Seow, thanks for the ID and elaboration of the different Miletus species!

    I agree with you that this individual is a female, as the hindwings are distinctly angled. In the 2nd picture, the angle of the butterfly to the camera and the shallow depth of field makes this difficult to see.

    Just to clarify, would M. gopara female have a more prominent tail as compared to M. gaesa female?
    Typically female M. gopara have longer tail at v4 than other species but this varies.
    http://v3.boldsystems.org/pics/BOPMB...1341158498.JPG

    You can look at all three species, namely ,biggsii, gopara & gaesa at PL 8 & 9 here.
    http://www004.upp.so-net.ne.jp/jamid.../borneo-e.html


    TL Seow: Cheers.
    PS. The only way to be sure if this is something new is to see the upperside.
    Last edited by Psyche; 08-Oct-2018 at 08:04 PM.

  8. #58
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    Thanks for the clarification and the links Uncle Seow!
    cheers
    Jonathan
    http://nypsbluebottle.blogspot.com/
    --- nothing happens by coincidence - everything is DESTINY ---

  9. #59
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    Dr Seow, Aaron, a few more arhopala for consideration, though I believe these are fairly typical.


    1) A. epimuta?



    2) A. pseudomuta?



    3) A. pseudomuta?



    4) A. muta / moorei? This one was definitely on the larger side for a muta-subgroup Arhopala, making me believe it is more likely to be a male A. muta.





    Finally, a Zographetus sp.
    cheers
    Jonathan
    http://nypsbluebottle.blogspot.com/
    --- nothing happens by coincidence - everything is DESTINY ---

  10. #60
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    1. A. epimuta . Note white HW tornal spot.

    2. A. pseudomuta male (shorter palpi, straighter FW margin.)
    3 female.
    The markings are more contrasted than usual ,suggesting some gene introgression ( cross bleeding).

    Typical A. pseudomuta , Singapore .Markings not well contrasted; HW spot 6 quadrate, submarginal band continuous.
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...-%20Horace.jpg
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...1---Horace.jpg


    Typical A. alitaeus Singapore.Markings deeply contrasted; HW spot 6 round to oval ; submarginal band macular (composed of almost separated spots)
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nEFhYQjWz6...%2BHoraceT.jpg
    http://www.butterflycircle.com/check...e_Simon_01.jpg


    4. Hard to tell which. The lighter blue with hint of green suggest A. muta.
    It is stated in Fleming the FW border is wider than that on the HW in A. moorei male.
    https://singapore.biodiversity.onlin...0441?imageId=0

    5. Typical Zographetus ogygia.


    TL Seow: Cheers.

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