Bindahara phocides phocides

The Plane

Family: Lycaenidae
Subfamily: Lycaeninae
Genus Bindahara
Species: phocides
Subspecies: phocides
Common Name: The Plane
Wingspan: 30 mm
Life History: incomplete
Extant in countries: •Singapore

Description
The male of the Plane is deep blackish brown with the apical area more ferruginous. The female is reddish brown with a large black spot in space 2 of the whitened tornal area of the hindwing. The underside features post discal bands on the forewings and four blackish subbasal spots. The ground colour of the males are brownish buff, whilst the females have whitish hindwings. The male has a pair of long yellowish tails whilst that of the female is white.

Habitat & Habits
This species has most often been seen in the shady under storey of thick vegetated areas within the nature reserves. It appears to prefer shady areas and flits from leaf to leaf, and often heads up towards the tree canopy where it is believed to spend more of its time. Its flight is reminiscent of the tailed Lycaenids like the Common Imperial and is able to fly quite quickly.

Other Observations
The butterfly appears to be more often than not, disturbed by the camera's flash and it flies off the moment it senses the flash. Males are more often observed than the females so far, and we have spotted a female of this species in the wild only once.

Early Stages
To be detailed.

Further Reading
Butterfly of the Month - April 2008

Herbison-Evans, Don & Crossley, Stella : "Australian Caterpillars Website", Scientific details of the Life History of Bindahara phocides

Bindahara phocides phocides

The Plane

Family: Lycaenidae
Subfamily: Lycaeninae
Genus Bindahara
Species: phocides
Subspecies: phocides
Common Name: The Plane
Wingspan: 30
Life History: incomplete
Extant in countries: •Singapore

Description
The male of the Plane is deep blackish brown with the apical area more ferruginous. The female is reddish brown with a large black spot in space 2 of the whitened tornal area of the hindwing. The underside features post discal bands on the forewings and four blackish subbasal spots. The ground colour of the males are brownish buff, whilst the females have whitish hindwings. The male has a pair of long yellowish tails whilst that of the female is white.

Habitat & Habits
This species has most often been seen in the shady under storey of thick vegetated areas within the nature reserves. It appears to prefer shady areas and flits from leaf to leaf, and often heads up towards the tree canopy where it is believed to spend more of its time. Its flight is reminiscent of the tailed Lycaenids like the Common Imperial and is able to fly quite quickly.

Other Observations
The butterfly appears to be more often than not, disturbed by the camera's flash and it flies off the moment it senses the flash. Males are more often observed than the females so far, and we have spotted a female of this species in the wild only once.

Early Stages
To be detailed.

Further Reading
Butterfly of the Month - April 2008

Herbison-Evans, Don & Crossley, Stella : "Australian Caterpillars Website", Scientific details of the Life History of Bindahara phocides

Early Stages Photos





Bindahara phocides phocides

The Plane

Family: Lycaenidae
Subfamily: Lycaeninae
Genus Bindahara
Species: phocides
Subspecies: phocides
Common Name: The Plane
Wingspan: 30
Life History: incomplete
Extant in countries: •Singapore

Description
The male of the Plane is deep blackish brown with the apical area more ferruginous. The female is reddish brown with a large black spot in space 2 of the whitened tornal area of the hindwing. The underside features post discal bands on the forewings and four blackish subbasal spots. The ground colour of the males are brownish buff, whilst the females have whitish hindwings. The male has a pair of long yellowish tails whilst that of the female is white.

Habitat & Habits
This species has most often been seen in the shady under storey of thick vegetated areas within the nature reserves. It appears to prefer shady areas and flits from leaf to leaf, and often heads up towards the tree canopy where it is believed to spend more of its time. Its flight is reminiscent of the tailed Lycaenids like the Common Imperial and is able to fly quite quickly.

Other Observations
The butterfly appears to be more often than not, disturbed by the camera's flash and it flies off the moment it senses the flash. Males are more often observed than the females so far, and we have spotted a female of this species in the wild only once.

Early Stages
To be detailed.

Further Reading
Butterfly of the Month - April 2008

Herbison-Evans, Don & Crossley, Stella : "Australian Caterpillars Website", Scientific details of the Life History of Bindahara phocides

Early Stages Photos